GOOD NEWS

RCMB XI Taking Steps towards Saving the Environment at Cleanergy Park

 

Davao City –The branch took another milestone in helping the environment through its mangrove tree planting while cleaning up plastics along the sea shore at Cleanergy Park on June 14, 2019.

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“We planted 40 mangrove trees called “bakhaw” and collected plastics along the shore in Punta Dumalag”, GODP focal Cary Jun Montero said.

“This is part of Green our DOLE Program of the branch.  This was made possible in partnership with Davao Light and Power Co., Inc. under its Corporate Social Responsibility called cleanergy which was also fully supported by management with the presence of HR Manager Janice Remolona”, OIC-Director Aerrine Marie R. Reyes announced today.

DLPC posted many learning statements in the park.

For one, mangrove forests are also home to wildlife species like birds, monkeys, insects and honey bees. Migratory birds depend on mangroves for their seasonal migrations.

Philippine mangroves, however, have declined by more than 50% within the last century.  The remaining 130,000 mangroves as of year 2000 are only 26% of what we had in 1918. Aquaculture is identified as the major cause of mangrove forest lost as most mangrove trees forests have been converted into fish, shrimp and crab culture ponds.

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“This also is very timely because Dr. Ken Anthony Lao, a veterinarian and his team of The Ark Veterinary Clinic whom we invited are here to examine the condition of the recently rescued sea turtle which we name as “Turtle Panabo“, a type of hawksbill rescued from Panabo City.  We have also a team from Philippine Genome Center, a genomics-focused multidisciplinary research unit of the University of the Philippines (System) to get a blood sample from the specie for DNA sequencing” Community Relations Manager Fermin Edillon of DLPC opened to the group.

Fermin gave a brief orientation of the history of the park and its mission in helping preserve the place.  He said that sea turtles mostly hawksbill seasonally stay in the area for nesting.

“Hawksbill is a type of sea turtle which is critically endangered. That is why it is not allowed to make these species as pets”, Fermin stressed out.

 “DLPC continued the advocacy of the late Councilor Leo Avila, also known as Happy L.A. in preserving the natural nesting area of the sea turtle also known as “pawikan”, he emphasized.

Fermin also showed the picture, top view of the park in 2009 and how it improved in 2017.  Trees covered almost all of the area as a result of tree planting efforts.  Based on research conducted by University of the Philippines Mindanao and University of Southeastern Philippines, there are now 89 migratory bird species seen in the area from only five before.

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Fermin gave a brief orientation of the history of the park and its mission in helping preserve the place.  He said that sea turtles mostly hawksbill seasonally stay in the area for nesting.

“Hawksbill is a type of sea turtle which is critically endangered. That is why it is not allowed to make these species as pets”, Fermin stressed out.

 “DLPC continued the advocacy of the late Councilor Leo Avila, also known as Happy L.A. in preserving the natural nesting area of the sea turtle also known as “pawikan”, he emphasized.

Fermin also showed the picture, top view of the park in 2009 and how it improved in 2017.  Trees covered almost all of the area as a result of tree planting efforts.  Based on research conducted by University of the Philippines Mindanao and University of Southeastern Philippines, there are now 89 migratory bird species seen in the area from only five before.

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Fermin stated “Many schools have visited the park which they call Pawicamp, a daytour experience with “pawikans” which help them understand how they can contribute in keeping these endangered sea creatures from being extinct. We continue to give awareness to everyone willing to visit the area”.

“DLPC cannot do the mission alone. We need each other, we need companies, volunteers, community especially children who are the next generation to help preserve nature”, he added.

Aside from tree planting, DLPC and volunteers also conduct regular clean up drive to collect plastics in which more than 30 sacks are collected for every activity conducted. Sheila A. Rivera